Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group

Riding the Innovation Roller-coaster: Experiences of Developing Step Change Technology for Processing Industrial Minerals - Professor Sam Kingman - Recording available

Date From: 18 November 2014
Description: Professor Sam Kingman gives a one-hour webinar for the Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group, on the experiences of the University of Nottingham's Industrial Microwave Processing group's work into the development of step change technology for the processing of industrial minerals. Members of the Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group can replay a recording of this webinar, and obtain the slides, free of charge. Visit the group's Resources area and log in with your membership number and PIN / password to access the webinar archive.
Event Type: Webinar
Venue: Online
Organiser: Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group

 

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Topic

Professor Sam Kingman gives a one-hour webinar on the experiences of the University of Nottingham's Industrial Microwave Processing group’s work into the development of step change technology for the processing of industrial minerals.

The webinar starts by reviewing key Government and industrial technology roadmaps and assessing how effective industrial-academic partnerships have been in development and implementation of new technologies that offer a step change in process efficiency and sustainability.

Key barriers to the development of new technologies are elucidated and through the use of an interactive case study around the development of a successful microwave based process for the industrial exfoliation of vermiculite through microwave heating.

Particle exitThe use of microwave energy for processing vermiculite is not a new idea with various attempts reported over the last 20 years or so. However, despite significant research efforts a scaled commercial processes was never developed. This is a similar story for many other technologies.

Methods for overcoming barriers to commercialisation are introduced with focus given to ensuring that the value proposition is well founded, the fundamental science is well understood, a clear well-defined supply chain is in place, and it is also shown that support and training of plant operational staff is paramount to success.

End viewThe talk is of interest to anyone who is involved in the development of new technologies for processing minerals and materials, and concludes with a series of recommendations for anyone working on developing their own ideas towards commercial scale.

Presenter

Sam KingmanProfessor Sam Kingman is currently Associate Dean for Research in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham, UK, and was previously Head of the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the same institution. He was awarded a personal chair at Nottingham in 2006, which at the time made him the youngest full professor in the UK. He is also the Director of the National Centre for Industrial Microwave Processing (NCIMP) which is one of the largest activities of its type in the world. In addition to unique dielectric metrology and ultra high power microwave processing facilities, the Centre currently supports over 50 staff and graduate students who are working on a wide range of highly multi-disciplinary research, development and commercialisation projects in the field of industrial microwave processing.

In the past 12 years, Professor Kingman has published over 100 refereed journal papers and he is an inventor on over 20 patents in the field of industrial microwave processing. In 2008, the work of the NCIMP was recognised through the award of The Engineer Technology and Innovation Prize for Environmental Technology and the Environmental Prize of the Society of Petroleum Engineers and in 2011 Professor Kingman was awarded the Bielby Medal by the Royal Society of Chemistry, Society of Chemical Industries and the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining for his work to reduce energy consumption in chemical processing. Other prestigious awards include the Institution of Chemical Engineers Energy Prize in 2012 for work in microwave processing of industrial minerals, and the UK Medal for Excellence in Engineering (2001). Professor Kingman has presented numerous international invited and keynote lectures including a Friday Evening Discourse at The Royal Institution of Great Britain — a lecture series first delivered in 1826 by Michael Faraday and whose other presenters have included Dorothy Hodgkin, Alexander Fleming, JJ Thomson, Gugliemo Marconi and Ernest Rutherford. 

Format

A one-hour online session, with Q&A.

Duration (for CPD recording purposes): up to one hour.
If you are recording mandatory CPD you should refer to your own regulator's requirements as recognition of CPD hours may vary. Visit www.icheme.org/cpd for more information.

Webinar archive

Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group live webinars are free of charge and open to all to attend, but if you wish to gain access to the group's webinar archive giving slide presentations and recordings from past events to replay on demand then you'll need to be a member of the Mining & Minerals Special Interest Group. Join now >>

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If you're interested in giving an online presentation to our international community of chemical engineers, we'd like to hear from you. Please email specialinterestgroups@icheme.org with information on yourself and your proposed talk.

 

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