Workshops

Our workshop sessions offer additional learning opportunities, exploring certain core topics in more depth and encouraging you to reflect on how safety is managed in your organisation.

Workshop attendance is included in your conference fee. Please indicate which workshop(s) you plan to attend on your registration form.

Chemical Plant – Inherently Safer Design

Delivered by the IChemE Safety Centre (ISC)

12:30–14:30

The ISC has developed a range of interactive case studies based on real life incidents.

ISC Deputy Director Dr Zsuzsanna Gyenes will take you through one of these case studies, focusing on the application of inherently safer design in a chemical plant. The workshop takes you through the event without stating what the incident is, allowing you to participate in decisions made and provide your thoughts as the incident unfolds.

This case study will introduce you to the basic concepts of inherently safer design and challenge you to think about how it is applied in your organisation. It will also show how changing design intent can impact safety.

Implementing Human and Organisational Factors on Bowties

Delivered by CGE Risk Management Solutions

12:30–14:30

A recently published guide by the Centre of Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) and the Energy Institute (EI) on Bow Ties in Risk Management: A Concept Book for Process Safety (Process Safety Guidelines and Concept Books) includes a section on ‘Addressing Human Factors in Bowtie Analysis’.

This workshop takes a further look at the practicalities of implementing human factors to a bow tie, covering:

  • Overview of the bow tie guidance from the CCPS/EI
    • definitions of bow tie elements and examples of poor and good practice associated with each element
    • high-level overview on human factors
  • Where to include human factors in bow tie diagrams
    • characterising human factors as a threat
    • using human factors applications as barriers
    • viewing human-related failures as degradation factors
  • Options for visualising human factors, with discussion on the practical benefits and difficulties encountered in real-life applications
    • alternative approaches, using multi-level bow ties versus multiple bow ties
    • use of a standard set of human component questions to identify, dismiss or include the human factors
    • validating and monitoring human performance associated with barriers and degradation controls

The workshop will include group exercises and discussion.

Leadership and Collaboration in Process Safety

Delivered by RAS Ltd

12:30–14:30

Major accidents such as Buncefield, Texas City and Flixborough all illustrate that the consequences of poor process safety management can be catastrophic. As a result of Buncefield in 2005, the Process Safety Leadership Group was established and the eight principles of process safety leadership were developed. Now, over ten years on, how do we continue to ensure that these principles are reflected in how we operate our sites?

Through facilitated discussions and case studies, this workshop invites delegates to explore each of the principles of process safety leadership and how they can be successfully integrated in to all aspects of the plant lifecycle. The workshop will also highlight the benefits of collaboration, both internally and externally through representative trade associations in order to learn from others and achieve continuous improvement. Best practice will be shared and participants will be encouraged to share their experiences in order to benchmark success and consider how they can demonstrate compliance with the regulatory requirements surrounding leadership on high hazard sites.

Delegates will learn:

  • good safety is at the core of good business management
  • collaboration is key to successful process safety management
  • when it comes to safety, everybody is a leader

Human Factors in Health and Safety

Delivered by The Keil Centre

15:00–17:00

This workshop is aimed at delegates who have an interest in learning more about human factors. It starts with a broad overview of the human factors issues relevant to major accidents in the process industries, and then discusses human behaviour, errors and non-compliances in more detail.

The workshop will include case study exercises typical of the format used on the Human Factors in Health and Safety training programme offered by The Keil Centre and IChemE.

Lift Off – Leadership, Culture and Ethical Decision Making

Delivered by the IChemE Safety Centre (ISC)

15:00–17:00

The ISC has developed a range of interactive case studies based on real life incidents.

ISC Director Trish Kerin will take you through one of the ISC Case Studies, focusing on leadership, culture and ethical decision making. The workshop takes you through the event without stating what the incident is, allowing you to participate in decisions made and provide your thoughts as the incident unfolds.

This case study will challenge you to think about how safety is managed in your organisation and how your overall culture impacts safety outcomes.

Managing the Hazards of Creeping Change

Delivered by IChemE

15:00–17:00

A recent report published by The Energy Institute cited that creeping changes are a safety, environmental and business risk that have only relatively recently been highlighted as a significant issue. The Health and Safety Executive recommends the use of audits to identify and manage creeping change.

This workshop will explore how creeping changes have contributed to major accidents and provides guidance on how to plan and apply an audit to identify and manage creeping change within your own organisation.